Kohāṭī is a Hindko lingo of Kohat District, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, north-western Pakistan. It is talked in the city of Kohat and additionally in a series of towns running east along the street to Kushalgarh on the Indus. The overwhelming dialect of this region is Pashto, to which Kohati has been losing ground at any rate since Partition.[2] Kohati frames some portion of the “Hindko legitimate” gathering of tongues close by Awankari, Chacchi and Ghebi.[3]

It has obtained words from Pashto to a higher degree than other Hindko dialects.[4] A lexical comparability contemplate in view of a 210-thing wordlist discovered that it imparts 79% of its vocabulary to the Hindko tongue addressed the east in the city of Attock, and 76% each with the lingos promote east in Talagang Tehsil and Haripur District, and the rustic vernacular talked instantly north in Peshawar District.[5]

There are two phonological qualities which recognize Kohati from other Hindko assortments. One is the general loss of nasalisation in adjusted vowels toward the finish of a word (tũ > tu ‘you’). The other one is the unconventional acknowledgment of chronicled – dʒ-as – I-, nearly – yy-, in the word ʌi ‘today’ and in types of the verb ‘to go’, for instance vʌ̃ie ‘let him go’ (conversely individually to ʌdʒ and vʌɳdʒe in whatever remains of Hindko).[6]

Kohati likewise has a curious dispersion of the dative-accusative postposition. As in other Indo-Aryan dialects, the type of the thing utilized before postpositions is the slanted: pʊttʊr ‘child’ for instance has the angled shape pʊtre. To this frame Kohati annexes the postposition ã to shape the dative-accusative: pʊtre ã ‘(to) the child’, which is the example found in whatever is left of Hindko (as opposed to Punjabi where the postpostion is nũ or Saraiki, where it is kũ). But since the slanted shape in the plural is additionally – ã, Kohati keeps away from the progression of indistinguishable vowels by changing to ko in the plural: in this manner pʊtrã ko ‘(to) the sons’.[7]

References

Kohāṭī is a Hindko lingo of Kohat District, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, north-western Pakistan. It is talked in the city of Kohat and additionally in a series of towns running east along the street to Kushalgarh on the Indus. The overwhelming dialect of this region is Pashto, to which Kohati has been losing ground at any rate since Partition.[2] Kohati frames some portion of the “Hindko legitimate” gathering of tongues close by Awankari, Chacchi and Ghebi.[3]

It has obtained words from Pashto to a higher degree than other Hindko dialects.[4] A lexical comparability contemplate in view of a 210-thing wordlist discovered that it imparts 79% of its vocabulary to the Hindko tongue addressed the east in the city of Attock, and 76% each with the lingos promote east in Talagang Tehsil and Haripur District, and the rustic vernacular talked instantly north in Peshawar District.[5]

There are two phonological qualities which recognize Kohati from other Hindko assortments. One is the general loss of nasalisation in adjusted vowels toward the finish of a word (tũ > tu ‘you’). The other one is the unconventional acknowledgment of chronicled – dʒ-as – I-, nearly – yy-, in the word ʌi ‘today’ and in types of the verb ‘to go’, for instance vʌ̃ie ‘let him go’ (conversely individually to ʌdʒ and vʌɳdʒe in whatever remains of Hindko).[6]

Kohati likewise has a curious dispersion of the dative-accusative postposition. As in other Indo-Aryan dialects, the type of the thing utilized before postpositions is the slanted: pʊttʊr ‘child’ for instance has the angled shape pʊtre. To this frame Kohati annexes the postposition ã to shape the dative-accusative: pʊtre ã ‘(to) the child’, which is the example found in whatever is left of Hindko (as opposed to Punjabi where the postpostion is nũ or Saraiki, where it is kũ). But since the slanted shape in the plural is additionally – ã, Kohati keeps away from the progression of indistinguishable vowels by changing to ko in the plural: in this manner pʊtrã ko ‘(to) the sons’.[7]

References

Faraz was captured for composing sonnets that censured military rulers in Pakistan amid the rule of General Zia-ul-Haq . Following that capture, he went into a purposeful exile.[5] He remained for a long time in Britain, Canada and Europe before coming back to Pakistan, where he was at first selected as Chairman of the Pakistan Academy of Letters and later director of the Islamabad-based National Book Foundation for quite a while. He has been granted with various national and worldwide honors. In 2006, he restored the Hilal-e-Imtiaz grant he was given in 2004.[7]

He specified his present compositions and stated: “I now just compose when I am compelled to, from the inside.”[citation needed] Maintaining a convention built up by his coach, the progressive Faiz Ahmad Faiz, he kept in touch with some of his best verse amid the days when he was in a state of banishment. Renowned among the ‘verse of protection’ has been “Mahasara”. Faraz was additionally specified by performing artist Shahzada Ghaffar in the Pothwari/Mirpuri telefilm “Khai Aye O”.